Not exactly a routing that one sees often.....

A routing not seen very often…..

 

In part one, I focused primarily on the events leading up to the delivery flight of Lufthansa’s D-ABYT, including the Delivery Luncheon and a modest ceremony acknowledging the formal acceptance of the aircraft by Lufthansa.   I say modest because this flight was taking place the day following the Germanwings tragedy.   Lufthansa and Boeing appropriately toned down the energy around the delivery ceremonies.

Part II will focus on the actual flight which amounted to approximately 9 hours of ‘Avgeek’ bliss.   When else can you have most of a 747-8i aircraft available at your disposal to explore?    I spent more than a few minutes playing with cabin lighting controls, galley equipment, and the like.  Like a kid in the proverbial candy store……

One of the biggest and most obvious differences with this flight is the fact that the Economy Class cabin was void of any seating so it gave us a perspective that most will never have and hopefully my photos capture some of that.   The two observations that come to mind is realizing just how big the 2 economy cabins are and the amount of curvature of the fuselage at the back of the aircraft.   It is one thing to see the curves from outside the aircraft, its another to see the perspective from within cabin.

As I mentioned in Part I, approximately 70 passengers were aboard the flight and most of them were Boeing and Lufthansa personnel along with a few members from the German media.  I believe I may have been the only American aboard the aircraft that represented the US Media (scary thought isn’t it?).

About an hour before the flight, the pilots and cabin crew boarded the aircraft to prepare it for passengers.  In speaking with the cabin crew, it was the first time that any of them had been on a delivery flight so they were looking forward to the experience as much as we were.    Their biggest concern was making sure that the Lufthansa hospitality would be the same as conventional flights.   They would not disappoint…..

 

D-ABYT's Log Books and Manuals wait to be loaded on the aircraft.

D-ABYT’s Log Books and Manuals were brought aboard with the flight crew.

 

With an open Business Class seating policy on the main deck, it was fairly a quick and efficient boarding process.    As I mentioned in part I, the Boeing Delivery Center is considered an airport and we were required to pass security screening just as if we were at a typical airport.

Once passengers were seated, the cabin crew took over and proceeded to treat it like any other flight which included a choice of pre-departure beverages including champagne, water or juice and a small snack.    Soon after the beverage service, the IFE played the familiar Lufthansa Safety Video, the aircraft was pushed back from the gate, and we would be underway.

 

Cabin crew prepares pre-departure drink options

Cabin crew prepares pre-departure beverage service.

 

Departing from Paine Field is obviously a very unique experience since it is unlike any airport that most people will ever see.   Covering the ramp area are essentially billions of dollars of brand new aircraft, many who may have only flown once or twice as part of Boeing’s testing regiment to ensure air worthiness.   In addition, there are several aircraft that are dressed in their ‘greens’ and have yet to have their engines started or be painted.   It is certainly a one-of-a-kind place and any self-respecting aviation enthusiast should visit at least once.

As we were brought out the threshold of Runway 16, the ground crew did something that I’ve never seen before (obviously…).   Most of you are familiar with the red ‘Remove Before Flight’ flags that are usually attached to points that require inspection before the plane can depart.  In our case, the ground crew had removed all of these flags from ‘YT’ and had laid them out for the pilot to confirm that all flags were accounted for.  These flags were then loaded on the aircraft and this specific set will stay with the plane for as long as it is in service.

D-ABYT's personal set of "Remove Before Flight" Flags.

D-ABYT’s personal set of “Remove Before Flight” Flags.

Boeing's Ground Crew sends us off.....

Boeing’s Ground Crew sends us off…..

 

Once we were under our own power, the aircraft entered the runway where we sat for a few minutes allowing the engines to come to temperature.   Once cleared, we rolled down the runway towards Frankfurt and since I intentionally picked a window seat, I was able to record the departure.

How many departure videos from Paine Field  have you seen from inside the aircraft?    In the video clip below pay special at the 1:55 mark of the video…… our pilot executes a ‘Wing Wave’ much to the delight of passengers.   Apologies for a few moments where the video blurs, I was paying more attention to the outside than to the view finder.

 

 

Once at cruising altitude, the flight really took on a unique flavor.   The flight crew was quickly taking care of dinner service so those wanting to rest or work could do so quickly.    The catering was provided by Boeing and I must admit it was very good.  Considering that the aircraft’s galley equipment was not yet operational, insulated trollies were used to store the meals.   We even had the option between Steak (which turned out to be Filet) or Fish along with a favorite local beer.   I went with the Filet.

 

You don't need bone china to enjoy a meal!

You don’t need bone china to enjoy a meal!

 

Once dinner was over, I would spend the majority of the flight exploring the aircraft and enjoying the company and conversations with Boeing and Lufthansa personnel.   It turned into a valuable opportunity to network and gain insights that are not normally available outside the companies.

As I mentioned earlier being aboard this flight provided perspectives that most passengers will never have especially when it comes to having access to empty cabins and cabin equipment.  Hopefully the photos will do their job and give you an idea of just how unique this experience was for me.  I’ll end my words here and let the photos tell the story.  I’ll come back with Part 3 that will look at various bits of outstanding swag that was given to us, along with what is possibly the best and most complete amenity kit that I’ve ever seen.  Stay tuned!

 

Looking towards the rear of the aircraft in the rear Economy Cabin.

Looking towards the rear of the aircraft in the rear Economy Cabin.

 

Rear Economy Cabin

The Rear Economy Cabin.   The rope down the center is there to hold on to in the event of turbulence.

 

Looking towards the front of the aircraft from the rear Economy Cabin.  The curve of the fuselage is apparent without seats.

Looking towards the front of the aircraft from the rear Economy Cabin. The curve of the fuselage is apparent without seats.

 

The 'forward' Economy cabin....notice the leg room?  The front part of this cabin will feature the Premium Economy seats.

The ‘forward’ Economy cabin….notice the leg room? The front part of this cabin will feature the Premium Economy seats.

 

The upper deck Business Class cabin.

The upper deck Business Class cabin.

 

A pair of Ovens and Coffee Makers.   Cost of the coffee makers?  $12,000 each.

A pair of Ovens and Coffee Makers. Cost of the coffee makers? $12,000 each.

 

Galley Ovens

Galley Ovens

 

Having no seats to contend with, I had the opportunity to capture angles and scenes that would normally not be possible had the seats been installed.   The following shots of the wing and engines would be difficult to take if seats and passengers were in the way.

 

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Even had the chance to witness the 'Northern Lights'.

I Even had the chance to witness the ‘Northern Lights’.

 

Capturing sunrise from the cabin.

Capturing sunrise from the cabin.   This angle would not be possible with seats in the way.

 

The engine is as much a piece of art as it is an engineering masterpiece.

The engine is as much a piece of art as it is an engineering masterpiece.

 

Same engine, now at sunrise over the Atlantic

Same engine, now at sunrise over the Atlantic.

 

The substantial curvature of the right wing.

The substantial curvature of the right wing is impressive.