Coming This Summer From Lufthansa:   Sushi In Economy Class!

Coming This Summer From Lufthansa: Sushi In Economy Class!

Lufthansa has announced that they will be introducing an ‘A La Carte’ menu for passengers traveling in Premium Economy or Economy class on long haul flights out of Frankfurt and Munich.

The program will be similar to what is offered by Austrian, where passengers can order specific meals ahead of their flights.

The Lufthansa version of this program will begin this May, and will give passengers the option to order one of several unique meals for their flights.    As far as pricing is concerned, expect to pay between $20 and $35 per meal.

The menu will cover a wide range of options including Sushi served in Bento Boxes, Mediterranean Seafood, Thai curry, Bavarian specialities, an Asian ‘vitality’ meal, or simply a grilled steak.

The meals can be ordered as part of your booking process.  Orders need to be placed at least 24 hours prior to your departure.

The standard, complimentary economy or premium economy meals will be available as usual for passengers not wishing to purchase the ‘A La Carte’ option.



LUFTHANSA Updates A380 Service Details From Munich

LUFTHANSA Updates A380 Service Details From Munich

In 4 weeks (on March 25, 2018), Lufthansa will finally begin deploying their A380s in Munich with flights to Hong Kong, Los Angeles, and Beijing.    Though that is not ‘new’ news, LH did provide an update today regarding the logistics at the airport when it comes to gates and security screening.    Considering the A380 can carry twice the amount of passengers as the typical long-haul planes LH currently uses in MUC, it was obvious that certain things needed to change at security screening and the gates that LH will use for the A380.

According to Lufthansa, the A380 will use gates H47 and H48 located inside Terminal 2, and gates L11 and L13 that are located in the new Satellite terminal.  In addition, gates L24/26 and L28/30 are retrofitted with a 3rd passenger bridge that will give passengers direct access to the upper deck.

Munich Airport and Lufthansa have also adjusted the security screening process to make it a bit easier to get through security and to the gate as a result of having substantially more passengers boarding the A380 as compared to other aircraft that usually use Terminal 2 and the Satellite Terminal.

Current plans call for LH to utilize 5 A380 aircraft in Munich to cover these initial routes.


Airbus Keeps Hinting At The Inevitable Demise Of The A380…….

Airbus Keeps Hinting At The Inevitable Demise Of The A380…….

The A380 has been making news over the past few months, but not in a positive manner.

Rumors have been swirling around Toulouse that the A380 program is on life support, and only being kept alive by a faint chance that a single airline can save it from the scrap pile.   To rekindle said rumors, Airbus once again stated on Monday (January 15) that the A380 program is at risk unless substantial orders come in.    Airbus’ Chief Operating Officer, John Leahy, spelled it out very succinctly:  “If we cannot work out a deal with Emirates, I think there is no choice but to shut down the program”.

Emirates and their decision whether or not to order additional A380s will either allow the program to limp along for a few more years or begin it’s immediate descent into obscurity.   Expectations had been for Emirates to place a substantial order in 2017, but that never happened, thus the A380 program is now in perilous peril (for you Holy Grail fans out there).     Either way, the A380 program seems doomed, whether now or in a few years.

Emirates had the chance to step up during air shows in 2017 when large orders are typically announced.  It’s good publicity for both Emriates and Airbus to make such splashy announcements.   However with no A380 announcements at any airshows, it doesn’t take a genius to read between the lines that either 1) Emirates is tired of the A380 and is looking towards a 2-engine replacement in the 777x, or 2) Emirates is squeezing Airbus into some ridiculously  attractive discounts since Emirates is the one that has all leverage at this point.

Either is plausible, but I think option 1 might be what is playing out here.

If memory serves, Airbus had predicted a healthy market for over 1,100 A380s to fill the sky but since the types inception in 2005 only a few over 200 have ever been delivered.   95 are still in queue for being built, with most of those going to Emirates and a few to leasing agent Amedeo.   Not good when the existence of the entire A380 line hinges on one carrier.