Latest From Homeland Security Boss:  Electronics Ban May Not Be Necessary

Latest From Homeland Security Boss: Electronics Ban May Not Be Necessary

In the soap opera known as ‘Will There, Or Won’t There Be An Electronics Ban’ it appears that the latest chapter suggests that we may not have much to worry about.

Speaking at the International Summit on Borders, Homeland Security boss John Kelly state that he ‘has a fair amount of confidence’ with the notion that aviation security measures can be improved and increased, thus benefiting passengers.

He added “The good news is, I think … with a fair amount of confidence, that we can raise the level overall of aviation security and not inconvenience the traveling public very much, if at all in some cases and just really add to the security and get our arms around”

Though he didn’t altogether come out say there’s nothing to worry about regarding a ban, it appears that he may be less keen than he was a few weeks ago on ruining travel for millions of people.

Let’s see how the story changes in the coming days and weeks.   It seems like we get alternating positions from Homeland Security as far as the ban is concerned.

 


Coming to the USA?  We Might need your Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook IDs

Coming to the USA? We Might need your Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook IDs

In a proposal submitted by Homeland Security, visitors coming to the US under the Visa Waiver Program may be asked to provide a listing of their various social media ‘profiles’.  Specifically, this would apply to ESTA and I-94W applicants.

In the proposal, Homeland Security suggests that any information provided would only be used for ‘vetting and contact purposes’.

As scary and invasive as this sounds, the proposal as written suggests that providing this addition information will be ‘voluntary’.  However critics of the proposal suggest that most applicants will feel like they have to submit the information so that their applications are not deemed suspicious or incomplete.

The proposal is now open to a 60 day period for public comment before any further steps are taken.

How’s that for Big Brother concepts??