Latest From Homeland Security Boss:  Electronics Ban May Not Be Necessary

Latest From Homeland Security Boss: Electronics Ban May Not Be Necessary

In the soap opera known as ‘Will There, Or Won’t There Be An Electronics Ban’ it appears that the latest chapter suggests that we may not have much to worry about.

Speaking at the International Summit on Borders, Homeland Security boss John Kelly state that he ‘has a fair amount of confidence’ with the notion that aviation security measures can be improved and increased, thus benefiting passengers.

He added “The good news is, I think … with a fair amount of confidence, that we can raise the level overall of aviation security and not inconvenience the traveling public very much, if at all in some cases and just really add to the security and get our arms around”

Though he didn’t altogether come out say there’s nothing to worry about regarding a ban, it appears that he may be less keen than he was a few weeks ago on ruining travel for millions of people.

Let’s see how the story changes in the coming days and weeks.   It seems like we get alternating positions from Homeland Security as far as the ban is concerned.

 


Electronics Ban Update:  Latest Version May Impact Flights From 71 Airports

Electronics Ban Update: Latest Version May Impact Flights From 71 Airports

During testimony in Washington DC yesterday,  Homeland Security boss John Kelly signaled that he is prepared to expand the current Electronics Ban to include 71 airports around the world.

His premise for this threat stems from these 71 airports not meeting the screening standards that are expected of them by US security officials.    He declined to say which 71 airports he was referring to.

This list of 71 would most like include the 10 that are already on the list that prevents passengers from boarding with electronics larger than a typical smartphone.

He did say that any airport on the ‘banned list’ would have the opportunity to have itself removed if it upgraded its screening process to the level required by US Homeland Security.

For now, he did not indicated if, or when this extension would be put in place.

With all this said, it appears that Homeland Security may be softening its tone about the ban.   As little as 2 weeks ago, rumors started swirling that the ban would even affect flights departing the USA.   But in hearing Kelly’s comments yesterday, it appears that an airport may be exempt from a ban if it screens electronics ‘appropriately’.    I suspect that most if not all US airports have the ability to appropriately screen electronics, so I’m hopeful that the ban may not be an ‘all or none’ proposition.
 

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