Scenes From Safari: Part VII

Scenes From Safari: Part VII

Part 7 continues with more photos that I though were worth sharing from our recent Safari trip.    You’ll find below photos from a wide variety of critters including Giraffes, Leopards, Rhinos, Cheetahs and a few birds.   After the photos, there’s a short video showing an adolescent Elephant greeting our vehicle…..

If you missed my previous installments, use the following links to see each part:

Part I,   Part II,   Part III,   Part IV,    Part V,   and Part VI

 

Night_Heron

A rare daytime sighting of a Night Heron

Hamerkop_Saddle_Stork

A Hamerkop (left) and a male Saddle Bill Stork share a watering hole…..

Scarnose_Wind

A Majingilane Pride Lion, nicknamed ‘Scar Nose’ puts his ‘hair’ into the wind……

Hyena_Hug

Hyena siblings enjoying a moment……..

Rhino_Scratch

A young Rhino hones his horn on the post…..

Giraffe_Head

A Giraffe leans in to see what I was doing……

Hippo_Submerged

A suspcicious Hippo finally came up after spending 5 minutes under water.

MoonRiseDulini

Capturing a moonrise behind a Leadwood tree with Stars in the background.

Ravenscourt_Male_Leopard

A Leopard is not distracted by having her photo taken……

Cheetah_1

A male Cheetah looking towards a herd of opportunity.

Rhino_1 copy

This elder Rhino is missing a fantastic sunrise……

Crocodile

This Crocodile is leaving after being beaten in a fight by an even larger Croc.

African_Grey_Hornbill_Male

A Gray Hornbill sits in the highest tree he could find…..

Torchwood

Another Leopard takes a pause after a succuessful hunt (notice the blood on his shoulders?)

 

 


Scenes From Safari:  Part VI – RHINO VIDEO!

Scenes From Safari: Part VI – RHINO VIDEO!

This installment picks up where parts I, II, III, IV, and V left off (please click on a ‘number’ to be taken to that part).

Here you’ll find an assortment of critters including Elephants, Lions, Dung Beetles, Birds, etc. etc.  At the bottom of this post, be sure to watch the Rhino video.   We were as close as we could get without jumping on him for a ride 😉 !

 

Did You Know? Elephants can communicate with each other through infrasound from 10-15 miles away!

Did You Know? Elephants can communicate with each other through infrasound from 10-15 miles away!

 

Mongoose_2

A Mongoose provides a rare pose.

 

Othawa_Behind_lodge

I was about 30 yards away from these Lionesses with nothing between us. Fortunately they were too lazy to do anything about it.

 

 

 

 

Tasselberry_Ravenscourt

A male and female Leopard (Ravenscourt and Tassleberry) are about to enjoy each other’s company.

 

Dung_Beetle

Dung Beetles battle over a pile of……territory.

 

Greater_Blue_Ear_Starling

Common but beautiful, the Blue-Ear Starlings shimmers in the sunlight.

 

Red_Bill_Hornbill

A Red-Billed Hornbill

 

Mom

Mom, Mom, Mom, Mom, Mom, Mom, are you up? Mom, Mom, Mom, Mom, Mom


 

In this video, we experience a Rhino come as close to us as possible without sitting in the truck with us…..

Scenes From Safari:  Part V

Scenes From Safari: Part V

I continue to work through my hard drive and memory cards in search of my favorite shots.   In this installment enjoy the Hippos, Rhino, Leopard, and Cheetah.   I’ve also attached a video of an underrated and very critical critter…….

To catch up on previous posts in this series, please use the following links:  Part I, Part II, Part III, Part IV.

 

A Lion Cub returns my stare.....

A Lion Cub returns my stare…..

African Green Pigeon

African Green Pigeon


 

A Rhino and Cape Buffalo create an interesting alliance.....

A Rhino and Cape Buffalo create an interesting alliance…..

A beautiful pose by 'Xikavi'

A beautiful pose by ‘Xikavi’

A Wild Dog enjoys his reward from a successful hunt

A Wild Dog enjoys his reward from a successful hunt

Dayone approaches

Dayone approaches

Cheetah looking at potential target

Cheetah looking at potential target

Cheetah_Sit

A Hippo casts a cautious glance in my direction....

A Hippo casts a cautious glance in my direction….

Elephants_BW

No Safari is complete without Elephants!

Dugga

Cape Buffalo…in this case a ‘Dugga Boy’, or an old male that has been kicked out of the breeding herd…..Sound familiar?

 

In the following video, you’ll see Dung Beetles working a pile of Dung as they prepare to lay their larvae.   The Beetles will lay their larvae in the dung, roll the dung into a near perfect ball and bury it.  In about 2 weeks the larvae will hatch and emerge from the dung ball.    The newly-hatched Beetle will live for about 2 years.